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Know Your Deadite (Pt. 2)

Know Your Deadite (Pt. 2)

The Girlfriend Seemingly harmless at first, the Girlfriend can be one of the most dangerous Deadites you can encounter. In life, these monstrosities can be your strongest ally: loyal, clear-thinkers with a good eye for an escape plan. If these creatures aren’t spouting off how they want to bathe in your hot, bubbling blood, they’re a nice asset to have around. While their physical prowess and agility are nothing to trifle with, personal connections to these horrendous demons from hell are usually a survivor’s downfall. Probably the smartest of the Deadites, Girlfriends are known to tug on the heartstrings of unsuspecting victims to manipulate them into doing their bidding – before biting into their flesh. How To Take Them Down No lies, these Deadites might be the end of you. To make sure you have a fighting chance, you’re going to need to keep your wits about you. No mad fits here! Weapons are always a bonus. REMEMBER! Girlfriends are usually close contact fighters – they’ve gotten in close before, they’ll do it again – making melee weapons a prime choice. Of course, a chainsaw is perfect for any occasion.   The Hillbilly Do NOT rely on these demon spawn. Often enough, survival teams will have at least on Hillybilly among them. They often adhere themselves to groups by providing keen knowledge of local geography, weapons handling, and can carry a tune 9 times out 10. Tempting as these traits may seem, the demons of the overall wearing variety are prone to dissent, and have sent more than one group prematurely to their doom. Hillbillies have brute force on...
Know Your Deadite (Pt. 1)

Know Your Deadite (Pt. 1)

Prepare. Defend. Survive. When tackling Candarian Daemon – colloquially known as a “Deadite” – it’s a smart idea to know what you’re up against. Not all demons come at you in the same way: we here at Bootless Stageworks have narrowed down our classifications to these basic types to better ensure the species’ survival. The Slut  Not the brightest bulb in the Home Depot, this Deadite is easy pickings. Identifying a Slut, pre-transformation, can be difficult, but most common occurrences stem from bars, dance clubs, and your best friend’s bedroom. Key visuals tend to be neon colors, exposed midriff, and tattoos on the lower back. While highly visible at night, most camouflage in sweatpants and shirts during daylight hours. Notorious for being a stage-5 clinger while alive, the Slut mimics this pattern in death – often times hunting down her last partner before engaging in a killing spree. Due to their impressively high heels, most can never achieve more than a slow shamble. How to Take Them Down Give them weapons. No. Seriously. Sluts will, nine times out of ten, take care of themselves. Give them your guns, your machetes, your flame throwers – and let them take care of the rest. You’ll have one dead Deadite in no time.   The Bit Part Demon Despite hearsay to the contrary, these Deadites do exist! Though rarely seen (and never heard), Bit Part Demons tend to be “filler,” often time compromising 80% of Deadite flocks. They’re one hit wonders that go down easy, often with a single shot, acting as shields for the more powerful members of the group. Bit Parts,...
Your Move – Chess, April 17 & 18

Your Move – Chess, April 17 & 18

Combining the rolling tunes of ABBA, Cold War tensions, a board game, and an emerging-artist theater sounds odd, even by musical standards. No, this is not some post-modern retooling of Mamma Mia!, but Bootless’ newest production, Chess. Chess, presented in concert format, tells the fictional story of a romantic triangle between American Chess Grandmaster, Freddie Trumper, Soviet Chess Grandmaster, Anatoly Sergievsky, and Florence Vassy, a woman who manages one and falls in love with another. Underlying these romantic tensions, a more political game is being played between the American and Russian representatives. In a time tinged red, these characters fight for their countries, and their own attempts at happiness. “I have a weird history with Chess,” starts Justin Walsh, the Arbiter for the grandmaster faceoff.  “I first heard about Chess when I was 15 and massively into 80’s rock musicals.  I didn’t really give it a chance, and the uber-electronic, ABBA-fueled sound of the original just never did it for me.  I still have that copy…somewhere.” Many audience goers may know ABBA either through their love of 80s music (and there is no shame in that), or their other brief Broadway interlude with Mamma Mia! What most are unaware of is Tim Rice’s involvement in the venture. Best known for productions such as Evita and Jesus Christ Superstar, the lyricist knows his way around his 80s tunes. He levels out the synth with speech like patterns mimicked by principles and chorus alike. “Flash forward to the new concert version,” continues Walsh, “and I was like ‘Oh…right, Chess!  I love that show,’ even though I had never really listened.  The...
A Word From Our Artistic Director – Rosanne DellAversano

A Word From Our Artistic Director – Rosanne DellAversano

Some people consider me mean when I say, “Enough with the kids and everything being about kids.  Who will champion for adults wanting to become artists?”  Don’t get me wrong, I like kids. I have one of my own. All I’m saying is, I find it discouraging to see such a disproportionate amount of funding poured into schools for art while emerging artists — the kids of yesterday who were the recipients of those same art programs that ignited the artistic spark  — are left out in the cold. Here’s what I see. Little Mary and her classmates are given the gift of engaging in the arts either through a class trip to a local theater, or a visiting artist completing a demonstration, or enjoying music class once a week. After one of those engagements, Little Mary thinks, “I want to be an actor” and she means it. Turns out, Little Mary has some talent. Little Mary works hard throughout her school years. Not only does she attend her regular school but, as she gets older, she attends acting classes, voice lessons, and possibly dance lessons. For some lucky Little Marys, these lessons are at low cost or even free because of arts funding for kids. For most, Mom & Dad have to spend a small fortune. (But hey, Mom & Dad also pay for Little Jonny to become an Olympic swimmer.) Little Mary graduates high school after being the lead in all of her school’s theater productions and performing with a few community theater groups. Mary, as she is now known, heads off to college as a theater...
Interrogation Files: Geremy Webne-Behrman

Interrogation Files: Geremy Webne-Behrman

“I’m convinced that my entire life is a TV show. But unlike Truman I’m okay with this. The writers of my life give me great material,” says Geremy Webne-Behrman. Shooing the camera crew further out of sight, we proceed with the interrogation. Webne-Behrman has the challenging task of portraying Peter, the AWOL army deserter and spinner of conspiracies, in Bootless Stageworks most recent production of BUG. While Peter is initially depicted as soft spoken, perhaps even suffering intense bouts of PTSD, it all gets…well, buggy. Think government testing, illicit bombings, and information usually left for conspiracy theorist. If you haven’t heard about this most recent production, despite its glowing (radiating?) reviews, you’re obviously not paying attention to your government mandated internet-caches. This will be rectified shortly. “Any play where the audience can empathize with the people on stage is important,” continues Geremy, speaking on the plays timeliness. “In this case Peter goes to drastic measures to make himself feel safe, and even loved. Real people experience the displacement and the psychosis that Peter and Agnes go through, and worse.” For a man who started as the Ishmaelite in Joseph… – a character with only one line! – Webne-Behrman has certainly been given more to talk about (much to the chagrin of several vague government agencies). His character might appear, at first glance, firmly rooted in the “psycho villain” catergory, but Webne-Behrman has, without a doubt, tapped into an underlying humanity with Peter’s character. “What made Peter immediately accessible for me were his two extremes. I can easily relate to how shy and soft-spoken he is when he first meets...